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How March Madness Can Guide Your Investment Strategy

Picking the right investment strategy to meet your financial goals may seem as challenging as predicting which team will win the annual NCAA tournament. However, there are a few ways that picking an accurate March Madness bracket parallels a successful investing strategy. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Look for a solid coach. A good way to successfully create a bracket is by selecting teams that have a coach with a solid track record. This is also true for your investment strategy – set yourself up for success by working with a qualified, experienced investment advisor.

Think about…


Q4 Investment Outlook

The Investment Committee of the Univest Wealth Management Division, under the direction of Timothy Chubb, Chief Investment Officer, recently met to review and update key performance indicators in order to chart its strategy for the remainder of the year. In the final quarter of 2018, the Committee expects to see a healthy U.S. economy and continued geopolitical uncertainty which may limit asset returns.

The following is the updated outlook as we head into the fourth and final quarter of 2018.


Every forecast is predicated on the information currently available and subject to the…


2018 Investment Outlook

The Investment Committee of the Univest Wealth Management Division, under the direction of Timothy Chubb, Chief Investment Officer, recently met to review and update key performance indicators in order to chart its strategy for the coming quarter. In the coming year, we expect to see a healthy U.S. economy and, at this point, modest equity returns given current stock market valuations.

The following is the Committee’s outlook for 2018.

Every forecast is predicated on the information currently available and subject to the risk of unforeseen events, and ours is no exception….


Is the Three-Legged Stool of Retirement Broken?

The three most common sources of retirement income are traditionally known as the three-legged stool of retirement which is made up of pensions, Social Security, and personal savings. For decades, retirees and investors have been able to rely on these three legs for support. However, in recent years, the stool has become broken, forcing investors and soon-to-be retirees to lean on some legs more than others or even to look to other sources for retirement income security.

These days, it’s common to find many people that lack in all three areas. According to the Insured Retirement Institute, approximately 72…


Roth 401(k) – Is It Right for You?

First, let’s define a Roth 401(k) and how it works. It is an employer-sponsored investment account that is funded with after-tax money up to a contribution limit. The amount you are able to contribute each year is dependent on your age. In 2016, the maximum annual contribution limit for people below age 50 is $18,000. For those over the age of 50, you may contribute up to $24,000 through a “catch-up” contribution. Of course, each employer may establish lower limits, based on their needs and testing requirements. Below are some commonly asked questions about the Roth 401(k).

What’s the difference…


Investment Lessons from the Olympics

The 2016 Olympic Games captivate audiences and provide motivating stories of determination and triumph. While watching, I can’t help but relate the Games back to the work we do as financial advisors. In many ways, following a sound long-term financial plan actually has things in common with the Olympics.

Plan Your Strategy

These athletes train relentlessly for years to perfect their sport. It’s a process that takes discipline, planning, fine-tuning and hard work, not dissimilar to following a financial plan. For most of us, the end goal is providing for our family and enjoying a comfortable retirement rather than a…


What is a REIT?

A Real Estate Investment Trust, commonly referred to as a REIT, is a corporation that owns commercial real estate or mortgages.  One of the main reasons to invest in REITs is for the income they produce. For a corporation to be classified as a REIT by the IRS it has to return 90% of its taxable income back to its shareholders.

REITs have been in existence for more than 50 years and can be publicly traded on exchanges (there are more than 200 such companies) or private corporations, of which there is more than 1,100. Publicly traded REITs have a…

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